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What is a CID?
A City Improvement District (CID) is a geographically defined area where ratepayers agree, in a legal contract with the City Council, to provide supplementary services in that area. This is done through a levy on the total amount of basic property rates, that is, land and building value, paid by the ratepayers in the area.

As an added-value service, the CID is designed to top-up the levels of service that the municipality provides through the dedicated levy. The CID does not in any way replace the services that the local authorities already provide, nor does it mean that there is a reduction in these services or in the rates. The CIDs work closely with local authorities and Our Hood to identify where supplementary assistance is required. The CID services include security, cleansing, social intervention and promoting the area.

Why were CIDs created in Green Point and Oranje-Kloof?

Up until the introduction of the Green Point City Improvement District in 2001 and Oranje-Kloof City Improvement District in 2002, these areas respectively showed serious signs of urban degeneration and distress. Since their inception, the CIDs have acted as a coordinated voice that effectively deals with problems affecting the region.

What is the GP/OKCID mandate?

  • To make the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof areas safe, clean, attractive and accessible by providing a range of enhanced management services.
  • To capitalise on rejuvenation successes in the CBD, taken together with the success of the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, to ensure that Green Point and Oranje-Kloof become an integral part of an attractive destination.
  • To improve the economic well-being of the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof areas and all its stakeholders.
  • To facilitate public and private investment in the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof areas.
  • To market the assets of the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof areas.
  • To develop a close and mutually beneficial work relationship with the local authority.
  • To make Green Point and Oranje-Kloof an integral part of a world-class city.
  • Supplementary security.
  • Supplementary cleansing.
  • Assistance with the enforcement of by-laws.
  • Enhancement of the environment.
  • Promotion of assets unique to the area.
  • Business growth and development.
  • Increased property values.
  • A coordinated voice to effectively deal with problems affecting these particular areas.

What else does the GP/OKCID do?

  • Establishment of various social programmes, that is, job creation, addressing homelessness or fostering synergy among NGOs.
  • Studying and analysing international success stories on urban renewal and extracting key elements suitable for the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof contexts.
  • Participating in the determination of a strategic plan and urban renewal initiatives.
  • Improving accessibility by supporting investment in public infrastructure and transport.

What are some of the key achievements of the GPCID?

  • Since July 2001 crime has dropped by some 65%, according to the South African Police Service (SAPS).
  • The CID pays for 35 security officers in the CID area. Were it not for the CID, continual patrols would not be available to the area. We have one dedicated law enforcement officer patrolling the area.
  • Every month, an average of eight tons of litter is collected from the streets of GPCID, in addition to what Council collects as part of its normal cleansing service.
  • Numerous incidents of graffiti are removed from the CID every month.
  • To date, the OKCID has been involved in the relocation of more than 15 homeless people.
  • Since July 2001, more than R4 billion of new investment has been attracted to the GPCID as a result of an improved urban environment.
  • Business has been maintained in the GPCID and capital flight from the CID has dropped sharply. Take-up of new commercial and residential space has resulted.

What are some of the key achievements of the OKCID?

  • Since February 2002 crime has reduced by over 60%, according to SAPS.
  • The CID pays for 18 security officers in the area, making patrols possible around the clock. We have one dedicated law enforcement officer patrolling the area.
  • Each month, an average of nine tons of litter is collected from the area. This is in addition to what the City Council collects as part of their normal cleansing services.
  • To date, the OKCID has been involved in the relocation of more than 10 homeless people.
  • Numerous incidents of graffiti are removed from property within the area every month.
  • Business has been maintained in the OKCID; no capital flight has taken place. There has been a positive take-up of commercial and residential space in the area
  • Since July 2001, more than R1,5 billion of new investment has been attracted to the GPCID as a result of an improved urban environment.

 

What social intervention activites does the GP/OKCID run?

The CIDs are actively involved in social intervention programmes. The CIDs continuously endeavour to find sustainable solutions to the problems associated with homelessness. For example, the CIDs assist the homeless in their areas through various rehabilitation programmes run in conjunction with local NGOs as well as neighbouring CIDs.

On occasion the CIDs have relocated homeless individuals to join their families as far afield as Messina in the Limpopo Province. Furthermore, the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof CIDs also assist with the employment of rehabilitated homeless individuals when opportunities arise and to date have employed more than 21 such individuals.

Liquor complaints: The Western Cape Liquor Authority (WCLA) welcomes any feedback from members of the public regarding liquor-related matters. Further, we encourage the public to report on any irresponsible trading of liquor as well.

Recently, there has been a complaint raised at the WCLA about a liquor outlet that is close to a community park. These kind of allegations are taken seriously by the WCLA and, as a result, they lead to investigations. Moreover, there has been a full investigation conducted on the premises already. The WCLA will continue to monitor the premises.

We appreciate your feedback, enquiries and complaints. For any liquor-related enquiries, you can contact the WCLA contact centre at 021 204 9805/204 9700 or by email, liquor.enquiries@wcla.gov.za.

How is a CID funded?

The cost of providing supplementary services is borne by all property owners in the area under the city bylaw referred to as Special Ratings Areas (SRA). Costs are borne in proportion to the value of the property. The CID approach is holistic, therefore members´ needs are routinely considered. The CID has helped to enhance the environment and strengthen investor confidence. The CID facilitates economic growth, business investment and development. The CID has helped create a positive identity for the area. The CID provides private sector management of top-up services. The CID is a Section 21 company that is controlled by a Board of Directors made up of property owners in the CID. Levies raised by the CID are only spent within CID boundaries. The CID is committed to improving the environment and thus serves the needs of all its users effectively.

 

How is the SRA levy collected?

The cent-in-the-rand tariff is applied monthly to the current valuations, as captured on the City´s financial system. These SRA levies appear separately on the monthly municipal account of all the property owners within the CID area. The CID Management is responsible to ensure that all properties within the CID area are on this database. The CID may split the database and budget in respect to commercial and residential properties for the purpose of calculating a different SRA levy per usage.

When a Special Ratings Area has been established the Council will levy, in accordance with the provisions of the relevant legislation, a property rate in addition to the rates that it already charges on the owners of rateable property in the City Improvement District, which will be for the purposes of the City Improvement District.

The SRA levy is a product, expressed as a cent-in-the-rand, of the valuation base (Municipal value of properties within the CID area) and the SRA budget. This cent-in-the-rand is applicable over a financial year which runs from 1 July to 30 June.

All Municipal property valuations are based on the year 2012. This means that any new developments or improvements to property are valued as if it were the year 2012. Previous legislation (before 1 July 2012) stipulated that new developments or improvements to property will be valued as above and added to the valuation roll on 1 July (new financial year). This means that property rates were back dated to the date of completion within the previous financial year. In terms of the new Municipal Property Rates Act being implemented from 1 July 2012, the valuation roll will now be amended quarterly in the same financial year.

Valuations change due to interim valuations, technical adjustments, Valuation Court rulings, sub-division, rezoning or other corrective actions within a financial year. Should the valuation base decrease as a result of the above, Council must inform the CID accordingly. If the levies then billed are not sufficient to meet the required SRA budget, in terms of its approved Business Plan, a recalculation of the SRA levy would be necessary. This SRA levy adjustment could only be implemented as follows: at 1 January for the remaining period of the current financial year; back dated at the end of the financial year; or incorporated as a special item in the following year´s budget by the CID.

Similarly, should the valuation base increase as a result of the above, Council must inform the CID accordingly. If the levies billed significantly exceed the SRA budget, in term of its approved Business Plan, a recalculation of the SRA levy could be required as per the above options.

Any new developments and other actions initiated by the property owners, within the current financial year that could influence the valuation base will NOT be included in determining the SRA levy (cent-in-the-rand) of that financial year. The valuation base is a snapshot at a point in time (end February) and is used to calculate the cent-in-the-rand for the following financial year. SRA levies will NOT be back dated as is the case with property rates to the date of completion. The valuation as per Council records for the applicable month will be multiplied with the fixed cent-in-the-rand per CID.

The City provides the CID with a report, indicating the payment status of the SRA levy per property. The CID Board assists the City to pursue such members who are in default. This is required to reduce the arrears and to improve available financial resources for the CID to perform its functions and meet its obligations.

Yes. Once the SRA is approved in terms of the SRA by-law, and the SRA complies with all of the requirements.

Each month the City pays over one twelfth of the SRA budget as approved for that financial year.

The CID budget and proposed SRA tariff is approved by the City during the budget process and advertised in the local press (during April) for comment prior to implementation as from 1 July.

The City provides the CID Management with a property database (owners detail and Municipal valuation), as per Council records, at the end of February.

The CID Board must submit a detailed budget for the following financial year to the City by 31 January. The CID shall split its budget in respect of residential and commercial components for the purpose of calculating a differential SRA levy per usage. The proposed budget may not deviate materially from the approved Business Plan and five year budget as approved at conception. If the proposed budget deviates materially from the approved Business Plan an application in terms of section 11 of the by-law is required. This application will be submitted as a separate report to Council.

The SRA levy is collected by the CITY on behalf of the CID and subsequently paid over to the SRA. The levy income is that of the CID and NOT the City although it shares an invoice to keep collection costs at a minimum. Should you be in dispute with the City you must pay your SRA levy regardless. You have to stipulate (if you are only paying the CID levy) otherwise any payment will be directed against Council debts. These stipulated payments can only occur at a Council cash office.

No, as per the by-law the SRA levy can only be spent on additional municipal functions within the CID boundary.

What is a SRA levy?

When a Special Ratings Area has been established the Council will levy, in accordance with the provisions of the relevant legislation, a property rate in addition to the rates that it already charges on the owners of rateable property in the Special Ratings Area, which will be for the purposes of the City Improvement District.

How is the SRA levy calculated?

The SRA levy is a product, expressed as a cent-in-the-rand, of the valuation base (Municipal value of properties within the CID area) and the SRA budget. This cent-in-the-rand is applicable over a financial year which runs from 1 July to 30 June.

When is the municipal property valuation determined?

All Municipal property valuations are based on the year 2012. This means that any new developments or improvements to property are valued as if it were the year 2012.
Previous legislation (before 1 July 2012) stipulated that new developments or improvements to property will be valued as above and added to the valuation roll on 1 July (new financial year). This means that property rates were back dated to the date of completion within the previous financial year.
In terms of the new Municipal Property Rates Act being implemented from 1 July 2012, the valuation roll will now be amended quarterly in the same financial year.

What if the valuation base changes within a financial year?

Valuations change due to interim valuations, technical adjustments, Valuation Court rulings, sub-division, rezoning or other corrective actions within a financial year.
Should the valuation base decrease as a result of the above, Council must inform the CID accordingly. If the levies then billed are not sufficient to meet the required SRA budget, in terms of its approved Business Plan, a recalculation of the SRA levy would be necessary.
This SRA levy adjustment could only be implemented as follows:
at 1 January for the remaining period of the current financial year;
back dated at the end of the financial year; or
incorporated as a special item in the following year´s budget by the CID.

Similarly, should the valuation base increase as a result of the above, Council must inform the CID accordingly. If the levies billed significantly exceed the SRA budget, in term of its approved Business Plan, a recalculation of the SRA levy could be required as per the above options.

What about new developments?

Any new developments and other actions initiated by the property owners, within the current financial year that could influence the valuation base will NOT be included in determining the SRA levy (cent-in-the-rand) of that financial year.
The valuation base is a snapshot at a point in time (end February) and is used to calculate the cent-in-the-rand for the following financial year.
SRA levies will NOT be back dated as is the case with property rates to the date of completion. The valuation as per Council records for the applicable month will be multiplied with the fixed cent-in-the-rand per SRA.

Why is the CID management asking property owners to pay their SRA levy?

The City provides the CID with a report, indicating the payment status of the SRA levy per property.
The CID Board assists the City to pursue such members who are in default. This is required to reduce the arrears and to improve available financial resources for the CID to perform its functions and meet its obligations.

Is the SRA levy mandatory to all properties within the CID area?

Yes. Once the SRA is approved in terms of the SRA by-law, and the SRA complies with all of the requirements.

Is the SRA only paid what the City collects?

Each month the City pays over one twelfth of the SRA budget as approved for that financial year.

How is a property owners informed of the SRA levy?

The SRA budget and proposed SRA tariff is approved by the City during the budget process and advertised in the local press (during April) for comment prior to implementation as from 1 July.

How is the valuation base determined?

The City provides the CID Management with a property database (owners detail and Municipal valuation), as per Council records, at the end of February.

Could the SRA Budget be changed within the three year Business Plan cycle?

The CID Board must submit a detailed budget for the following financial year to the City by 31 January.
The CID shall split its budget in respect of residential and commercial components for the purpose of calculating a differential SRA levy per usage.
The proposed budget may not deviate materially from the approved Business Plan and three year budget as approved at conception.
If the proposed budget deviates materially from the approved Business Plan an application in terms of section 11 of the by-law is required. This application will be submitted as a separate report to Council.

What happens if I am in dispute with the City regarding my municipal account?

The SRA levy is collected by the CITY on behalf of the CID and subsequently paid over to the CID.
The levy income is that of the CID and NOT the City although it shares an invoice to keep collection costs at a minimum.
Should you be in dispute with the City you must pay your CRA levy regardless. You have to stipulate (if you are only paying the SRA levy) otherwise any payment will be directed against Council debts. These stipulated payments can only occur at a Council cash office.

Can my SRA levy be spend anywhere in the City?

No, as per the by-law the SRA levy can only be spent on additional municipal functions within the CID boundary.

Social Intervention

The CIDs are actively involved in social intervention programmes. The CIDs continuously endeavour to find sustainable solutions to the problems associated with homelessness. For example, the CIDs assist the homeless in their areas through various rehabilitation programmes run in conjunction with local NGOs as well as neighbouring CIDs. Three fieldworkers were assigned to the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof areas in July 2005 to assist with these programmes.

On occasion the CIDs have relocated homeless individuals to join their families as far afield as Musina in the Limpopo Province. Furthermore, the Green Point and Oranje-Kloof CIDs also assist with the employment of rehabilitated homeless individuals when opportunities arise and to date have employed more than 18 such individuals.

Annual Reports

2016

GPCID_AGM_30Nov2016_Minutes

OKCID_AGM_30Nov2016_Minutes

Oranjekloof – Proposed 5 year budget (Renewal) & 2017/2018 budget

Green Point – Proposed 2017 – 2018 budget – Final

OKCID_Proxy_2016

GPCID_Proxy_2016

City Implementation Plan_OKCID_2016

City Implementation Plan_GPCID_2016

Notice of Annual General Meeting

CoR 36.2

Notice of AGM and agenda 2016

OKCID_AFS_2016_Draft

GPCID_AFS_2016_Final

2015

GPCID_AGM_3Dec2015_Minutes

OKCID_AGM_2Dec2015_Minutes_

Green Point- Proposed 5 year budget(Renewal) & 2016/2017 budget

Oranjekloof – Proposed 5 year budget (Renewal) & 2016/2017 budget

City implementation plan GPCID_2015

City implementation plan OKCID_2015

GPCID Proxy 2015

OKCID Proxy 2015

GP AFS 30 June 2015

OK AFS 30 June 2015

2014

Oranjekloof5YearBudget_2014-15

Green Point Proposed Budget 2015/2016

OranjeKloof Proposed Budget 2015/2016

Oranjekloof CID AFS 2014

Greenpoint CID AFS 2014

GPCID Implementation Plan 2015 – 2016

OKCID Implementation Plan 2015-16_

OKCID_AGM_Pack_2014

GPCID_AGM_Pack_2014